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How To Keep Your Pet’s Teeth Healthy #DentalPetFacts Infographic

How to keep your pet's teeth healthy

That’s my Kallie up there! She’s been part of our family for over ten years now. Kallie is a keeshond, a breed related to Samoyeds and Pomeranians. Go check the link – there’s even a super cute picture of Kallie as a 9-week-old puppy at the bottom of that dog breed page I linked! Even though she’s a senior dog now, she still acts like a puppy most of the time. I love her goofy smile, and I want to keep Kallie and that smile healthy for a long, long time.

A recent survey by Ipsos Reid revealed that 88% of us know that healthy teeth are linked to our animal friends’ overall good health. We love our pets and of course we want only the best for them, but 25% don’t know what dental disease looks like, which means many pets may be suffering in silence. Do you know what to look for?

Dental disease is the most common clinical health problem for Canadian dogs and cats. By age one, almost 85% of all pets have some form of periodontal disease caused by dental plaque which forms calculus (tartar) over time. Small dogs are particularly vulnerable. It starts with gingivitis (red gums), but over time the infection can go down the root and affect the bone and attachments of the teeth. Symptoms include inflamed gums, bad breath, poor appetite, excessive drooling, pawing at the mouth and even tooth loss.

There is no tooth fairy for pets - learn the #DentalPetFacts and how to keep your pet's teeth healthy!

The good news is that dental disease is preventable! The most important thing you can do for your dog or cat’s oral health is to take them to the vet regularly. Your vet will do a thorough oral and health exam and provide you with a treatment plan for keeping your pet healthy. Treatment options can include regular brushing, dental cleaning, or a dental pet food diet.

Our strategy is to incorporate Kallie’s dental care into our regular routine to help stay on top of things. My four-year-old thinks it’s fun to brush the dog’s teeth, so that’s one way we encourage her to start on her own bedtime routine. “Let’s go upstairs and brush Kallie’s teeth, and then it will be time to brush yours!” We schedule Kallie’s dental cleaning with the vet at the same time as she gets her vaccinations. Because remember, there’s no tooth fairy for pets!

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Join us at the #DentalPetFacts Twitter party on Thursday, February 26th, at 8:00 p.m. EST. Prizes include 10 Visa gift cards, ranging from $25 to $100, as well as fun pet related merchandise. RSVP HERE!

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Win a $100 Visa Gift Card & Royal Canin Prize Pack!

Enter for your chance to win a $100 Visa Gift Card and dental heatlh prize pack including a Royal Canin tote, 12 oz Feline Dental bag, 1 package Medi-chews, Pet Dental kit, and first aid kit. Contest open from 12:00:01 a.m. EST February 16, 2015 to 11:59:59 p.m. EST February 28, 2014. No purchase necessary. Must be legal resident of Canada who has reached age of majority in their province of residence. Entries must contain hashtag “#DentalPetFactsContest”. Selected entrant must correctly answer skill-testing question. Prize: $100.00 (CDN) Visa Gift Card and Royal Canin Prize Pack. Void where prohibited.

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Disclosure: I am participating in the Royal Canin #DentalPetFacts campaign and receive compensation as part of my involvement. All opinions expressed are completely honest and my own. Your experience may differ.

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59 Comments

  • I was surprised to learn that Discolouring of the teeth, as well as loss of bone and soft tissue are signs of dental disease.

  • It’s not surprising, but bad breath is a sign of bacteria. Our girl doesn’t have bad breath, dog breath, but it isn’t bad.

  • Well I am a long long LONG time pet owner, so I pretty much knew all the facts…. very well. That the bad breath can be a sign of dental disease. I spent a LOT of good money on my little dog’s teeth. LOL Now I have a cat that I think should begin the yearly visits….

  • I was actually already made aware of these facts by my vet when I got my first cat 5 years ago and am reminded at vet appointments to regularly check for these things. Of course, I’m always a little worried I might be missing something because she might be hiding it from me.

  • Learned that cats manages their pain in silence, so their discomfort can be easy to miss. But sometimes the pain they experience can be so great, their behaviour changes. Talk to your vet. just love cats and dogss o this is good to know.

  • I learned that when your cat has dental decease, your cat manages their pain in silence, so their discomfort can be easy to miss.

  • I was suprised that discolouring of the teeth, as well as loss of bone and soft tissue are signs of dental disease.

  • not with my dog ( 1yr Yorkie) but many of my friends will complain about the smell of their dog’s breath, reading this article and the statement Bad breath is a bad sign.I will encourage them to go see a vet.

  • I have always had cats so I am familiar to the signs and what to look out for. it definitely is something to keep in mind though since we never bring our cat to the vet since he is indoor, we have to watch out for anything out of the norm

  • The most surprising fact that I learned is that the pain dogs experience can be so great, their behaviour changes. I had no idea.

  • Inflammation occurs when plaque and tartar (calculus) spreads under the gumline, resulting in reddening or swollen gums (gingivitis). This is when real problems start, and in more advanced stages, you may notice bleeding in your cat’s mouth. Your veterinarian has options for you to reverse the progression.

    never think of cats this way..oh well

  • Inflammation occurs when plaque and tartar (calculus) spreads under the gumline, resulting in reddening or swollen gums (gingivitis).

  • I was surprised that pets can hide their pain. Hopefully, with the amount of times I handle my cats in a day, I will notice anything amiss.

  • I always figured that dogs just had bad breath… Seriously. So learning that halitosis is a sign of dental disease was a surprise. Thanks.

  • The most surprising fact I learned is that inflammation occurs when plaque and tartar spread under the gumline

  • i think i can say that i knew all these facts i take great care of my dogs teeth he actually loves brushing his teeth!!

  • I learned that my dog’s bad breath is actually a sign of a build-up of bacteria associated with dental disease.

  • Pets suffering pain in silence was somewhat surprising. You’d think as a pet owner you’d know when something was wrong/changed with pet. Sadly we don’t.

  • Bad breath can be a sign of dental disease. My six year old chihuahua has terrible breath even though I brush her teeth almost every day.

  • Dog Dental Fact 1 of 4: Bad breath is a bad sign.
    A build-up of bacteria associated with dental disease can result in bad breath (halitosis). It’s not just dog breath. It is an important sign of dental disease, so speak to your veterinarian about your dog’s dental health.

  • I learned that cats” Inflammation occurs when plaque and tartar (calculus) spreads under the gumline, resulting in reddening or swollen gums (gingivitis)”

  • I learned A build-up of bacteria associated with dental disease can result in bad breath (halitosis). It’s not just dog breath. It is an important sign of dental disease, so speak to your veterinarian about your dog’s dental health.